Connecting Columbia Union Seventh-day Adventists

Potomac Conference

On our descent down Mount Rainier, we made our way around the Wilson Glacier and crisscrossed the Nisqually Glacier, trying to avoid the many open crevasses, however, came to a crevasse we could not go around. We located a snow bridge to traverse over. After testing the bridge, we decided it was safe to cross. When it was my turn to go over, the snow bridge collapsed. I fell 14 feet and became wedged in the crevasse, upside down.

The four pillars of STEM—science, technology, engineering and mathematics—already shape nearly every aspect of our lives, and Adventist educational leaders, if interested in staying relevant in a business-minded world, must embrace its effects. It’s becoming clear that American business leaders of tomorrow are the STEM students of today.

The worldwide refugee crisis is prompting the United States to open its immigration doors to a larger number of people from regions in turmoil.

This dramatic increase will undoubtedly enhance the chances that families fleeing persecution may move into our communities in the near future. How should Seventh-day Adventists respond when refugees from Syria, Burma, Iraq, Honduras, Guatemala and other nations become our neighbors?

Jerrod and Jennifer Gabel

After prayerful consideration, Jerrod and Jennifer Gabel, directors of Camp Blue Ridge (Montebello, Va.) have decided to return to Washington State to work on his family’s long-standing farm. The farm has encountered significant challenges over the years and they feel a strong calling to return and support the family in this time of need. Their last day with the Potomac Conference will be Feb. 29.

The largest freshman class in 15 years—54 of them—recently enrolled at Shenandoah Valley Academy (SVA) for the 2015-16 school year. The Class of 2019 is comprised of 32 girls and 22 boys. Eight are children of 10 loyal SVA alumni.

Story by Janel Haas-Ware, Shenandoah Valley Academy